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June Hong Kong Jewellery & Gem Fair,
Hong Kong
June 25-28 2015
Booth No. 3C436
September Hong Kong Jewellery & Gem Fair
16-20 September 2015
AsiaWorld-Expo Hong Kong
Booth No. 7M-10~12
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THE FOUR C's

CUT:
The cut of a diamond determines its brilliance. There is no single measurement of a diamond that defines its cut, but rather a collection of measurements and observations that determine the relationship between a diamond's light performance, dimensions and finish. Determining a diamond's cut grade, however, goes beyond simple measurements of width and depth. Using an optical measuring device, a three-dimensional model is created to determine the diamond's proportions and angles. The interrelations between these various dimensions will greatly affect how light reacts once it enters and how it behaves once it exits;

Diameter: The width of the diamond as measured through the girdle
Table: The largest facet of a gemstone
Crown: The top portion of a diamond extending from the girdle to the table.
Girdle: The intersection of the crown and pavilion which defines the perimeter of the diamond.
Pavilion: The bottom portion of a diamond, extending from the girdle to the culet.
Culet: The facet at the tip of a gemstone. The preferred culet is not visible with the unaided eye (graded "none" or "small").
Depth: The height of a gemstone measured from the culet to the table.

Polish and symmetry are two important aspects of the cutting process. The polish grade describes the smoothness of the diamond's facets, and the symmetry grade refers to alignment of the facets. With poor polish, the surface of a facet can be dulled, and may create blurred or dulled sparkle. With poor symmetry, light can be misdirected as it enters and exits the diamond.

COLOR:
Acting as a prism, a diamond can divide light into a spectrum of colors and reflect this light as colorful flashes called fire. Just as when looking through colored glass, color in a diamond will act as a filter, and will diminish the spectrum of color emitted. The less color in a diamond, the more colorful the fire, and the better the color grade.

D Absolutely colorless. The highest color grade, which is extremely rare.
E Colorless. Only minute traces of color can be detected by an expert gemologist. A rare diamond.
F Colorless. Slight color detected by an expert gemologist, but still considered a "colorless" grade. A high-quality diamond.
G-H Near-colorless. Color noticeable when compared to diamonds of better grades, but these grades offer excellent value.
I-J Near-colorless. Color slightly detectable. An excellent value.
K-M Noticeable color.

CLARITY:
Diamonds that are absolutely clear are the most sought-after and therefore the most expensive. But many diamonds have inclusions -- scratches, trace minerals or other tiny characteristics that can detract from the pure beauty of the diamond. Clarity indicates how "clean" the diamond is, or how many inclusions (i.e. scratches, trace minerals or other tiny characteristics) the diamond has.

FL, IF Flawless, Internally Flawless: No internal or external flaws. Internally Flawless: No internal flaws. Very rare and beautiful diamonds.
VVS1, VVS2 Very, Very Slightly Included: Very difficult to see inclusions under 10x magnification. An excellent quality diamond.
VS1, VS2 Very Slightly Included: Inclusions are not typically visible to the unaided eye. Less expensive than the VVS1 or VVS2 grades.
SI1, SI2 Slightly Included: Inclusions are visible under 10x magnification, and may be visible with the unaided eye. A good diamond value.
I1, I2, I3 Included

CARAT:
When diamonds are mined, large gems are discovered much less frequently than small ones, which makes large diamonds much more valuable.

 
 
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